Why Choose Medical Compression Therapy

Do what you love. Do it in good health.

Venous disease (poor circulation), lymphedema and lipedema can limit mobility and cause discomfort, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy doing what you love. Therapeutic compression allows you to continue working, playing, traveling and living more comfortably. Its benefits also promote better health.

Choosing the correct compression garment is important for your health and wellbeing. Over-the-counter (OTC) or “consumer” compression garments are not the same as medical (RX) compression garments.

Non-medical or athletic compression garments may help your legs feel better, but if you have a circulatory or lymphatic medical condition, they could be dangerous to wear them. Why? OTC or athletic compression products may not be the appropriate dosage, size, option or containment for your health condition. Those garments don’t have the structure of a medical-grade compression garment, which is designed specifically to aid in the circulation of your blood and lymph. Most OTC or athletic compression products are designed for healthy people to assist in recovery from sports or casual activities. Depending on the shape of your limb and severity of your condition, only a medical compression garment will provide the therapeutic benefit necessary to help manage your condition.

Your doctor will prescribe your proper compression dosage (mmHg) and include product instructions on your RX script. Make sure your garment matches this.

Medical compression offers certain features that aid in managing your medical issues and can help improve health outcomes.

Medical compression products have graduated compression. This means 100 percent of compression starts at the ankle or wrist and decreases as it moves up the limb.
Consider this. When a doctor prescribes any medication, they always include a dosage amount on the RX script – you know how much to take and how often, right? Medical compression also has a dosage amount and it varies from mild (15-20 mmHG) to moderate (20-30 mmHg), firm (30-40 mmHg), to strong (40-50 mmHG). It's important you wear a compression garment with the appropriate amount of compression that your doctor prescribes.
Options for compression garments such as style, size, length and material also maximize therapeutic effectiveness. If you have lymphedema or edema (swelling), you may need a thigh-high or pantyhose style to compress areas from your foot to abdomen. Most OTC or athletic compression products are typically only available in knee-high styles, sized by shoe and offers limited sizes and lengths.
Consider this. When a doctor prescribes any medication, they always include a dosage amount on the RX script – you know how much to take and how often, right? Medical compression also has a dosage amount and it varies from mild (15-20 mmHG) to moderate (20-30 mmHg), firm (30-40 mmHg), to strong (40-50 mmHG). It's important you wear a compression garment with the appropriate amount of compression that your doctor prescribes.
Medical compression products have graduated compression. This means 100 percent of compression starts at the ankle or wrist and decreases as it moves up the limb.
Options for compression garments such as style, size, length and material also maximize therapeutic effectiveness. If you have lymphedema or edema (swelling), you may need a thigh-high or pantyhose style to compress areas from your foot to abdomen. Most OTC or athletic compression products are typically only available in knee-high styles, sized by shoe and offers limited sizes and lengths.

What does the structure of a medical compression garment mean? Structure is simply defined as delivery of pressure and the stiffness of the garment. The performance of the garment depends on the material used and how it is knitted. For example, higher containing garments use certain kitting techniques that make the product denser and less elastic, so it provides a high level of stiffness, which means greater containment. The key to controlling compression so that it’s graduated (or the dosage prescribed) is an additional inlay thread, which is knitted into the garment. Picking the right garment for you depends on a multiple variables – a medical professional and certified compression fitter should always assist you in making this decision.

To recap: Medical compression garments are very different from OTC stockings due to the garment structure. You may find an inexpensive OTC garment that looks exactly the same as a Juzo garment – similar fabric and color – but it may not provide the same level of stiffness or correct dosage, so it is ineffective for someone with lymphedema or venous disease.

For more information on picking the right product and understanding the types of medical compression products (Circular Knit, Flat Knit, Compression Wraps,) and how compression works (Working and Resting Pressure) click here.

 

  • Use medical compression garments when a licensed medical professional prescribes them and make sure you use a reputable brand that offers a therapeutic compression garment.
     
  • Consult with certified compression fitter to get the appropriate garment, correct size and proper fit.
     
  • Pick the right fashion for YOU. Today’s medical compression has a variety of colors, materials and even print designs.
     
  • Make sure the compression garment offers ease of use, comfort, durability and are easy to get on and off. You also should be able to machine wash and dry.
  • Use medical compression garments when a licensed medical professional prescribes them and make sure you use a reputable brand that offers a therapeutic compression garment.
  • Consult with certified compression fitter to get the appropriate garment, correct size and proper fit.
  • Pick the right fashion for YOU. Today’s medical compression has a variety of colors, materials and even print designs.
  • Make sure the compression garment offers ease of use, comfort, durability and are easy to get on and off. You also should be able to machine wash and dry.

Review the table below to learn more about how to pick the correct medical compression garments. Remember to always consult with a certified fitter when choosing a medical compression garment. Click here to find one close to you.

Lymphedema & Lipedema Product Recomendations

      DECONGESTIVE
PHASE
MAINTENANCE
PHASE
Indication Stage Symptom Juzo
Compression
Wrap
Juzo
Dynamic
Juzo
Dynamic
Silver
Juzo
Soft
Juzo
Expert
Juzo
Expert
Silver
Juzo
Expert
Cotton
Juzo
Strong
Juzo
Strong
Silver
Lymphedema 1 Spontaneously
reversible, soft
swelling, pressing
on the skin leaves
a pit, no skin changes
   

 

  2 Spontaneously
irreversible, onset
of fibrosis, very
little pitting,
sometimes skin
changes
     
  3 Advanced form,
elephantiasis,
fibrosis, chronic skin
changes
           
Lipedema 1 Fine-nodule skin
surface (orange peel
skin), fatty swelling
in hip area
       
  2 Coarse-nodule
uneven skin surface
with large
depressions
       
  3 Large, deformed skin
flaps and lobules,
with the tissue being
firmer and harder
     

Poor Circulation/Venous Disease Product Recomendations

Indication Juzo
Naturally
Sheer
Juzo
Soft
Juzo
Dynamic
Juzo
Dynamic
Cotton
Juzo
Silver
Juzo
Compression
Wrap

Minor varices

Beginning varices during pregnancy

Prophylaxis of venous disorders
for mobile patients

     
CVI stage 1
 
 
After thrombophlebitis
 

Primary varices

Secondary varices

Distinctive varices during pregnancy

 

Vein stripping

Sclerotherapy

After removal of leg veins (e.g. bypass
surgery heart)

   
CVI stage 2
 
 
Atrophie blanche
 
   
Phlebothrombosis
 
   
After healing of heavy venous ulcers
 
   
Thrombophlebitis
 
 
Severe secondary varices
 
   
CVI stage 3
 
   
Post-thrombotic syndrome